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Immediate Dentures

Immediate Dentures

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 What is an immediate denture?

An immediate denture is a complete denture or partial denture inserted on the same day, immediately following the removal of natural teeth.
What are the advantages of an immediate denture?
There are several advantages of an immediate denture. The most important factor is that you will never need to appear in public without teeth. It is also easier to duplicate the shape, color and arrangement of your natural teeth while some are still present in your mouth. When an immediate denture is inserted at the time of extraction, it will act as a Band-Aid to protect the tissues and reduce bleeding. An immediate denture will allow you to establish your speech patterns early. You will not have to learn to speak without a denture in place and then later relearn to speak with a new denture. An immediate denture will also allow you to chew better than without any teeth and minimize facial distortion that may occur when teeth are removed.
What are the disadvantages of an immediate denture?
The biggest disadvantage is the increased cost. Another disadvantage is that you cannot always see how the denture will look before the teeth are extracted and the immediate denture is inserted. Also, initially, an immediate denture does not always fit as accurately as a conventional denture, which is made after the tissues have healed for six to eight weeks following extractions, and without wearing a denture.
Why does an immediate denture cost more?
An immediate denture is initially more expensive than a conventional denture because additional time is needed for construction. A surgical stent (a guide for recontouring tissues after extraction) is often necessary and more follow-up visits are needed for adjustments and re-fitting. A soft temporary reline material will be utilized for re-fitting your denture when it becomes loose during the healing process. After the soft tissues have healed and shrinkage of the underlying bone has occurred (about six months following extractions), the immediate denture must be finalized by a permanent reline or new denture. At this time, you will be charged for either a reline or a new denture, depending on your choice.

Your doctor will discuss with you the pros and cons of a permanent reline versus making a new denture, to help you make a decision. A major advantage to making a new denture is that the immediate denture can be a spare denture if the new denture breaks, is misplaced, or has to be repaired or relined in our laboratory. If the immediate denture is relined, it will usually need to be left overnight while it is permanently relined in the laboratory.

Is an immediate denture for everyone?
Not everyone is a candidate for an immediate denture. Some people may be advised against this treatment, due to general health conditions, or because of specific oral problems.
How long does it take to complete?
Four to five visits may be necessary for the fabrication phase of an immediate denture, plus any preliminary surgery. For patients requiring a complete immediate denture, the back teeth are often extracted six to eight weeks prior to the fabrication phase. This allows the extraction sites to heal and a better-fitting immediate complete denture to be fabricated.
The fabrication phase consists of impressions, bite records, tooth selection and try-in of the back teeth. On the day of delivery, you will be seen in oral surgery for extraction of the appropriate teeth, followed immediately by the insertion of the immediate denture.

Eating & Speaking with Dentures

Eating & Speaking with Dentures

How Dentures Look and Feel

New wearers often report a “full-mouth” feeling, as though the dentures are too big and pushing the lips forward. This feeling will diminish as you adjust to wearing dentures. They may feel like they don’t fit properly at first. They may “gag” you or cause you to bite your cheek or tongue. If you wear an upper denture, it may take some time for your tongue to get used to the feeling of being pressed against the denture and not your palate. Don’t worry. These problems will decrease over time. 

New Sensations with Dentures

Because a denture is a “foreign object” in the mouth, you may produce more saliva for a while. This, too, will decrease and eventually go away. Something as simple as sucking on a mint or hard candy will encourage you to swallow more frequently, clearing excess saliva. Some soreness is also expected, usually within a few hours of putting your dentures in your mouth. If it continues, see a dental professional; never try to make adjustments to your dentures yourself. 

Eating with Dentures for the First Time

Dentures take some getting used to, but with a few simple strategies up your sleeve, you can feel confident all day long. As a new denture wearer, you may find that chewing feels different with dentures. You also may think that food has "lost its flavor." While you are adjusting to wearing your dentures, your mind is receiving strong signals from your mouth about your dentures, which overpower the messages from your taste buds. After you are accustomed to the denture, your mind will pay less attention to your dentures and more to your taste buds. 

During your adjustment time, you may have trouble sensing hot foods and drinks, which is common with new denture wearers. Be careful; you don't want to burn your mouth. 

Tips for Eating with Dentures

To eat more easily and enjoyably while wearing dentures:

  • Begin with small quantities of food cut into smaller pieces.

  • Chew half of the food in your mouth on the back-left side of your mouth and the other half on the back-right side. This will even out the pressure on your dentures.

  • Start with soft foods. Some good examples are eggs, fish, chopped meat, cooked vegetables, and puddings. After you feel more confident, try eating chewier foods, such as steak or celery.

Speaking with Dentures

When you speak, the sound reaches your ears through vibrations in the bones of the jaw and skull. Wearing dentures changes and increases the sound, but this is much more noticeable to you than to anyone else. 

If your dentures "click" when you speak, try to speak more slowly to avoid movements that raise and/or move your lower denture. Keeping your lower denture in place requires the ability to hold it still with the muscles of your lips, cheeks, and tongue. At first, these muscles may tend to "kick out" your denture. With time and practice, you will be able to overcome the difficulties of speaking. 

Tips for Speaking with Dentures

To speak more confidently while wearing your dentures:

  • Bite and swallow before speaking. This places your dentures in position so you can speak more clearly.

  • Practice reading aloud.

Why Choose Us?

Why Choose Us?

Why choose us? I’ve thought a lot lately about what separates us the most from our competition. Here is a list I’ve come up with:

1.) Customer Service - We go above and beyond for our patients treating them like family. We’re open on Saturdays and even come in on Sundays to do adjustments.

2.) Quality over Quantity - Today most clinics treat patients like a number. It’s the herd them in herd them out mentality. The more patients they can see the more money they can make. The quicker they can make a product the quicker they can get paid, but what was lost was quality. We never jeopardize a products quality to meet a certain quota.

3.) Price - We manufacture and customize each of our dentures with the best materials and state of the art methods for the most affordable prices. Sure you might see a lower price somewhere else but I can guarantee you the quality of materials they’re using and their manufacturing methodology won’t compete with ours. Cutting corners and using inferior materIals only leads to a disaster later.

4.) Generations of Craftsmanship - My family has been serving the treasure valley for almost 60 years. I’m a fourth generation denturist that was taught by the most respected and qualified denturists in Idaho. My great uncle and grandfather were denture pioneers leading successful denture clinics in Idaho for sixty years. My family has prided itself on building quality dentures and exceptional service.

What is a Denturist?

What is a Denturist?

A denturist's role is dedicated to solely providing removable full and partial dentures to their patients. We differ from a lab technician because we can have a practice that sees our own patients. We do not need a referral from a dentist to treat a patient in need of dentures or partials. Our well round knowledge of removable prosthesis (dentures) sets us apart from a general dentist because we spend all of our time only manufacturing and adjusting dentures. This gives us more experience allowing us to adjust dentures more easily as well as manufacture them more successfully. We hand craft each denture in our office where as a general dentist likely sends them out to a dental lab. This makes a huge difference in the overall success of a denture case. There is no denying that a general dentist has vastly more knowledge pertaining to total oral health and natural restorations but a denturist generally has more knowledge about dentures. Last and most importantly not least denturists usually charge way less for all denture services then your local dentist. So next time you or your friend are struggling with making a decision to choose a denturist or a dentist I hope this article will help. Make the right choice and see a denturist today. Oh, yeah and hopefully that means you choose us.