Viewing entries tagged
newsmile

Dentures In A Day

FullSizeRender.jpg

We have been reluctant to jump on board this new industry train for some time now because we wanted to make sure we had the right manufacturing techniques and steps in place so we wouldn’t have to cut corners or use inferior manufacturing methods like our competitors. A denture made in a day should have the same process and techniques as one made in a longer period of time. The importance of not cutting corners insures the patient great results that they can be proud of for many years. After much planning and relentless hard work we’ve come up with a system that allow us to build a beautiful denture without cutting necessary steps and still finish it in as little as 24 hours! Our process allows us to use the same high impact/high strength acrylic we use on all of our dentures. The patient still chooses the teeth and color of their choice. We still have time to set the teeth in wax so the patient gets to see what they look like before we transform them into their final dentures. The process stays the same and so does the quality! Call us today for more information. 

Sleeping with Dentures

Sleeping with Dentures

This is a very common question. Dentures (removable false teeth) offer a number of benefits to people who have lost their natural teeth: They can help them regain the ability to eat a greater variety of foods, speak more clearly, and smile with confidence. However, it’s important to recognize that there are also some downsides to wearing dentures.

For one thing, they put pressure on the gums and consequently the bony ridges beneath them. This causes resorption, a process that results in a gradual decrease in bone volume and density. Resorption and bone loss are accelerated if dentures are worn 24 hours per day. With the loss of bone comes inadequate support for the dentures, causing them to become loose and fall out more easily. This also results in less support for the cheeks and lips, which can cause very dramatic changes in facial appearance.

In addition, if they are not properly cared for, the under surfaces of dentures in particular can become breeding grounds for oral bacteria and fungi, which can cause odors, irritation and disease.

Resorption and bone loss are accelerated if dentures are worn 24 hours per day.

It has been found that those wearing dentures during the night while sleeping are more likely to have tongue and denture plaque, gum inflammation, positive cultures for Candida albicans (thrush, an oral yeast infection) and higher blood levels of interleukin-6 — a protein made by white blood cells that signifies the body is fighting an infection. Good oral hygiene among denture-wearers is very important and reduces the risk of serious illness.

For example, a recent study involving 542 randomly selected elderly nursing home residents found that the seniors who wore their dentures to sleep were 2.3 times more likely to die or be hospitalized from pneumonia as those who took their dentures out. The study noted that aspiration (breathing) is a significant means of moving pneumonia-causing bacteria from the mouth into the lungs in elderly people.

Whether you wear full or partial dentures, taking them out at night for sleeping gives the gums and other denture-bearing tissues a chance to rest, recover and receive beneficial exposure to the antibacterial agents naturally present in saliva.

There are other concerns. Wearing dentures continually, and especially at night when salivary flow naturally diminishes, often results in a condition called denture stomatitis (“stoma” – mouth; “itis” – inflammation). This affects tissues under dentures. Typically it occurs under upper full dentures that cover the palate, which becomes reddened, inflamed and infected with yeast. This is often accompanied by a disease called angular cheilitis, a cracking at the corners of the mouth and subsequent infection by the same yeast. Denture stomatitis is treated by leaving the dentures out at night, and cleaning them meticulously. Yeast infection is treated by anti-yeast or anti-fungal medication and/or chlorhexidine prescription rinses that can be prescribed by your dentist.

Whether you wear full or partial dentures, taking them out at night for sleeping gives the gums and other denture-bearing tissues a chance to rest, recover and receive beneficial exposure to the antibacterial agents naturally present in saliva. In short, removing your dentures at night is the healthiest thing to do.

A good oral hygiene routine for denture-wearers should include the following steps:

  • Remove and rinse your dentures after eating.

  • Brush your dentures at least once a day with a soft toothbrush, nailbrush or denture brush and dish soap, liquid antibacterial soap, or denture cleanser. (Don’t use toothpaste: it is too abrasive.) Using an effervescent (fizzing) tablet can’t substitute for this type of manual cleaning, and it might take some effort to remove the plaque or film that develops on the dentures.

  • Store your dentures in water or, better yet, an alkaline peroxide-based solution made for this purpose.

  • Brush your gums and tongue every day with an extra-soft toothbrush (not the one you use for cleaning your dentures) or clean them with a damp washcloth.

  • Rinse your dentures before putting them back in your mouth.

Even though you no longer have natural teeth, you still need to pay attention to your oral hygiene. Wearing your dentures 24/7 will prevent you from maintaining good oral hygiene, unnecessarily putting your health at risk.

Authored By: Dr. Kristen Vilardi-Shanley

Denture Instructions

Denture Instructions

INSTRUCTIONS TO DENTURE PATIENTS

A. WHAT TO EXPECT FROM YOUR NEW DENTURES

  1. You must learn to manipulate your dentures. At first you may look, speak, and eat in a way that you are unaccustomed. But with time, you should adapt very readily. Most patients require about 2 – 3 weeks to learn to work with new dentures. A few patients may require more time. But don’t be discouraged if you take longer than most.

  2. You will find that dentures are not as efficient as your natural teeth when eating. However, having dentures is better than being without teeth. When eating, start with soft foods and take small bites. Avoid biting with the front teeth because it will cause the dentures to become unstable and shift. This can lead to sore gums. It is best to cut your foods into small bites, but if you must “take a bite” use the area around the canine teeth.

  3. Your speech, as mentioned above, may sound strange initially. But with practice, perhaps reading aloud from a book or newspaper, you should be able to speak clearly in a few days.

B. ADJUSTMENTS

  1. You must return to your denturist/dentist for follow up appointments after the dentures have been inserted. In most instances, it is necessary to make minor adjustments to provide a more comfortable fit.

  2. In order for you to wear your dentures successfully, most patients will require adjustments of their attitude and habits.

  3. If soreness develops, that is considered a normal occurrence. Call your denturist/dentist for an appointment to have an adjustment. The irritation will not disappear by itself.

  4. We do not want you to “try and tough it out”. If you are unable to reach your denturist/dentist during holidays, weekends, or after hours, remove the dentures to prevent further trauma to the tissues.

C. YOUR ORAL HEALTH

  1. Nature did not intend for people to wear dentures. You must exercise care with the tissue beneath the dentures. It is recommended to rest the tissues at least eight hours a day. Most patients find it more convenient to leave the dentures out at night.

  2. The tissues that support your dentures are constantly changing. This may result in denture looseness. However, looseness can result from many causes. With time, your dentures will need either refitting or replacement. In any event, you should call your dentist for an appointment.

  3. Annual examinations of the supporting tissue for abnormalities and to assess the function and fit of the denture are important for your dental health.